Avocado and Pistachio nut Loaf

I do like a nice loaf. And (if I do say so myself) this is a rather nice loaf.

I made a version of this a little while ago, but it was lacking  …. something. I had no idea what that something was, so I left it and moved on to sweeter things for a while. When I was shelling some pistachios for a recent recipe it suddenly occurred to me that these could be the very thing my old loaf needed.

The problem with pistachios is that they take so long to shell,  I just couldn’t summon up the enthusiasm for a while. You may notice that in the recipe below I’ve been rather vague about the amount of pistachios used as I got a little bored at around the 30g mark and decided that was enough, but in all honesty a few more wouldn’t have gone a miss.

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Avocado and  pistachio nut loaf

200g Flour
1tsp Baking Powder
1/2tsp Salt
100g Sugar
100g Butter
1 medium Egg
1 ripe Avocado
100ml Creme Fraiche
Zest of 1 Lemon
3cm piece of Root Ginger
30-50g shelled Pistachio nuts

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Cream together butter and sugar until pale and fluffy
Fold in the flour, baking power and salt and stir well.

In another bowl mash the avocado until smooth, add the zest of one lemon and grate in the piece of ginger. Stir in the creme fraiche and beaten egg.

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Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir well until fully combined.

Shell pistachios and place in a plastic bag and roll hard several times with a rolling pin and crush into small pieces.

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Tip the bag of crushed nuts into the batter and combine.

Tip the whole mixture into a greased and lined loaf tip and cover loosely with baking paper. Bake at 180 degrees for 45 minutes to an hour. Remove the baking paper cover after the first 35 minutes.

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During the last 15 minutes of baking time test the loaf with a wooden skewer, when the skewer comes our clean, then you are ready to take the tin out of the oven and rest it for 5 minutes. After 5 minutes take the loaf out of the tin and allow to cool completely ( if you can ).

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I thought about adding a glaze or crust to this loaf, but in the end I’m really glad I didn’t as it simply doesn’t need any embellishment.

This is a lovely loaf to enjoy the next day when the cake has become more dense (and a lot easier to slice). Either on it’s own or spread with a little butter.
It’s not exactly sweet, but it’s not exactly savoury either, somewhere in-between, but it’s  very good with a feet-up cuppa, and lasts up to a week if stored wrapped in greaseproof paper in an airtight container.

Enjoy 🙂

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A Bientôt

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Sweet Somethings

Sugar and spice.  But mostly ……..

Sugar

I’m a relative newcomer to flavoured sugar, it’s only since I arrived in France and discovered small (and outrageously expensive) packets of vanilla sugar for sale. Of course I was curious, and then I was hooked. It took me quite a while to realise that with very little effort and expense I could have a ready supply at my fingertips by making it myself. I said I was curious, I never said I was bright.

So……. in my last recipe I used Lavender sugar and I’ve had quite a few queries about what on earth it is, where you can buy it and can you make it yourself?

Well lavender sugar is exactly what it sounds like, lavender flavoured sugar.
As to where to buy it I have absolutely no idea, which brings me rather neatly on to how you can make it. It’s really easy, and totally delicious too.

All you need is sugar, some lavender grains, a glass jar and a week or two. That’s it.

Fill a jar 1/3 with sugar chuck in a couple of spoonfuls of lavender grains, fill the jar to 2/3 with more sugar and add another spoon or 2 of lavender, close the jar and give it a good shake. Then put it in your cupboard giving it a shake every now and again and in just over a week it’s ready to use. You can tell it ready when you take the lid from jar and have a good sniff!

Now I’m quite a fan of the ‘bits’ in the sugar, but if you don’t actually want to have the grains mixed in then tie the lavender into small muslin sachets and pop them in the jar instead. It takes a little longer and a few more shakes to infuse the flavour, but works just as well. When you have used some of the sugar simply top up the jar and shake well. If you are using the sachets you will have to give the bags a little squeeze every now and again to release more of the scent.

Now I have a bit of a confession to make, I do have a small ‘problem’ with flavoured sugar. The problem is that there isn’t enough room in my cupboard for all the different varieties i have made. Once you get a taste for it ( and if you are me) the possibilities are almost endless. To date I have lavender sugar, vanilla sugar ( split a vanilla pod, bury it in a jar of sugar, shake and  leave for a week ), cinnamon sugar ( bury a couple of cinnamon sticks in a jar of sugar…. you know the rest by now ), clove sugar and chilli sugar ( I haven’t used the chilli yet, but I have an idea for it and will let you know if it works! )

part of my collection
The method for any of the citrus sugar is slightly different; zest your fruit and allow the zest to dry out before adding it to your sugar jars and this will avoid any ‘clumping’ of the sugar crystals.
For ginger sugar you can add a few pieces of crystallized ginger ( handy recipe just here ) or a couple of spoonfuls of dried ginger root powder.

If you don’t want any ‘bits’ in your sugar then simply pop the whole lot into a food processor and give it a whizz for a couple of minutes. Job done.
I’m still working on a satisfactory method for mint – I’ll let you know…

Now you might wonder what on earth you can use all these sugars for, but the possibilities are endless from simply stirring into tea or coffee to sprinkling on French toast or flavouring pastry or just about anything you can imagine.

I’m quite sure my curiosity will lead me on to many more experimental sugars, ( I’ve just discovered how to make coloured/flavoured sugar cubes, but I’ll keep that one for another time ), but if you have any ideas or suggestions, please let me know in the comments box.
Its just as well my coffee consumption is sufficient to keep up the supply of large jars that I’m going to need:)

A Bientôt.